Questioning Standardized Testing

A mechanical pencil sitting on a piece of paperState and federal governments seem to be focusing on standardized tests. In fact, it has almost become an obsession, and teachers, to keep their jobs, “teach to the test.”

As I was in a meeting about this the other day, a lot of people were asking questions about improving scores, getting into college, etc, but nobody asked the big question: is this the way we should be moving forward at all? Do standardized tests predict any kind of future success after college?

By the way, no standardized test ever taught me to think that critically! At any rate, when I went looking, I found all sorts of data about standardized tests and college performance. But that is not what I am interested in. I want to know this: do kids that do well on standardized tests have more job satisfaction, and do they earn more money than their peers? I am sure the answer may be “yes” simply because the kids that do well on the tests are likely more intelligent and come from “better families,” and they will likely end up with a college degree.

Measuring learning is a tricky thing. We can’t measure it very well, so in an effort to please bureaucrats and number-crunchers we come up with our best options. So, what should be more of a guide becomes a standard we use to evaluate every student, no matter their personalities, interests, or future plans. So, if you are a bad test-taker or were stressed out the day of the test, your entire future could rest on a score that doesn’t even reflect what you know, or your potential for future success. And, schools that try to create well-rounded and successful students are starting to scrap that and focus entirely on getting students to take a two hour test each year.

I have no issue with standardized tests, and I tend to do well on them. My GRE scores were great, as were my ACT scores. While that guaranteed me money for college and graduate school, neither made me a great teacher or an innovative small business owner. I learned those things other ways, and a lot of it was from teachers who took a break from “teaching to the test” and modeled excellence in other ways (by coaching, focusing on running clubs, showing me flexibility, reaching out through humor, etc). It would be a shame if in an effort to bring the average ACT up to 26 we lost out on time to teach and model other things that matter. I doubt Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, MJ DeMarco, and other highly successful people got where they are today by focusing so much on standardized test scores. Heck, who knows what could have been invented had teens not gotten stressed out about a number on a paper. Imagine if Bill Gates spent his waking hours trying to get a 35 on his ACTs. I might be typing this on a typewriter.

About David Bennett

David Bennett is a teacher, author, and speaker. His articles receive over a million hits per year and have appeared in a variety of publications. He is co-owner of a communication company, and he also writes for The Popular Teen and other sites. Follow him on LinkedIn or Twitter.