Teaching Soft Skills

friends on a pathMany of my teaching colleagues were amazed at how easily I interacted with students. Since they related to me, they liked me as a teacher and learned more. I often heard comments about how my attitude and outlook made them better students. The reason I had such success with my teenage students was because of my “soft skills.”

Soft skills are those characteristics such as hard work, communication, time management, positive attitude, and other intangible skills that help a person function effectively in employment and social settings. They are contrasted with “hard skills” such as adding numbers, conducting scientific experiments, welding, etc.

Since our educational system is geared mainly toward “hard skills,” employers often lament the lack of soft skills among their employees. When was the last time any school offered a class on having the right attitude, flexibility, or any other soft skill? It’s a shame because with the generally lousy job market, soft skills could really make a difference to our students and give them a big edge.

The question of why they aren’t learning soft skills isn’t a hard one. I think it can be chalked up to the calcified nature of the educational system. We’ve gotten so used to teaching certain subjects (and their variants) that we refuse (on an institutional level anyway) to consider teaching other subjects, especially ones considered “fluff.” And, now the state has stepped in and mandated content, effectively leaving no room for the teaching of soft skills even if a school wanted it. Some schools are even starting to focus more on soft skills (often labeled as social skills) since studies are showing their importance in future success.

Fortunately, educators can teach soft skills without having an actual class dedicated to them. How? Through modeling them. By being good communicators, keeping a positive attitude, and showing students how to use soft skills in the real world experience of a classroom, teachers are educating students on how to effectively use soft skills on a regular basis.

After all, when I hear from former students about how my teaching impacted them, they rarely talk about the subject matter I taught them. They talk about how I taught them about life and how to be successful.

Granted, as a religion teacher, I could focus more on modeling these skills, but I still consider myself a huge success in this regard. Even my work on this website and its companions (The Popular Teen and The Popular Man) are dedicated to soft skills.

So, if you are a teacher, try to integrate some soft skills into your lessons. The best way to do it is to model them.

About Jonathan Bennett

Jonathan Bennett is an administrator, author, and speaker with a background in teaching. His articles receive over a million hits per year and have appeared in a variety of publications. He is co-owner of the small business Theta Hill, and he also writes for The Popular Teen, The Popular Man and other sites.