What Is Model-Netics and Why You Should Take It – A Review

Gold FairwayIn late 2010, I was on a local golf course, when a representative from Main Event Management returned my call to discuss the possibility of taking Model-Netics, since a friend suggested I take it. My golf game is almost always bad (but fun), so it wasn’t like I was in any sort of groove. Fortunately, nobody was behind me, because I sat on hole 17 chatting with Randy for about twenty minutes about this great class.

Model-Netics is a management course consisting of 151 “models,” which are grouped into a variety of areas, including change, evaluation, and delegation.

These models explain a reality or issue in management, and provide a way to understand each issue, as well as providing solutions to problems involved. This way of “modeling” problems and solutions, is reminiscent of NLP, “neurolinguistic programming. Each model contains an image that goes along with it, to serve as a visual reminder, to learn it easier, and to recall it later. Thus, there “triangles,” “diamonds” and even a “pentagon” if a particular model has three, four, and five aspects to it, respectively.

One of my favorite models is “slot machine management,” because I see it happen so often in work settings. This model speaks to the trend among some managers to constantly change things when an idea doesn’t immediately work. It creates an inconsistent and ineffective environment.

The Model-Netics course reminds us (referring back to another model, “The Change Curve”) that often it takes time to see results from changes, and sometimes productivity goes down before going up after a change. So, managers that keep changing things up aren’t ever going to see results from their constant changes. “Slot machine” managers keep pulling the lever and nothing seems to work, rendering employees ineffective in the process.

I was one of the first people to take the course online. I took it on Friday afternoons, during my free period and lunchtime at school. As part of the course, I received a binder, a memory jogger (which summarizes the models, with images), and a headset with microphone. Every week, we would meet online, via Cisco’s webex.

The class was archived for later access, to go over the material or make up a missed class. The style was relaxed and engaging, and allowed for interactive discussion even though we were from all over the country. At the end of a few weeks, we would be given an online test. The only drawback was that the microphone headset they sent was pretty cheap. I ended up using my more expensive one.

Some critics have suggested that Model-netics is a way for managers to speak in “code,” and to form a kind of cult that uses language that employees can’t understand. This is not even close to being true.

Model-netics is ultimately about improving communication from “A” (manager) to “B” (employee), and helping each meet the other’s needs. Even though I expected to find some “anti-employee” attitude based on online posts, I didn’t find it at all. One of the principles of this blog (and our others, including The Popular Man) is to be cool to others. I would not be recommending this course if it somehow was uncool to employees (and students).

So why would I, a teacher, need to take this course? What, if anything, is a teacher? We are managers! We are managers of hundreds of clients, many which are not motivated to even be in our classes. We are genuine managers, yet we aren’t trained to manage people the way business majors are.

Model-Netics taught me a lot about how to manage my classroom, and manage the people I deal with. One model that is particularly helpful regarding students is “Define To Delegate.” This means that you must clearly state what you need someone to do when you delegate a task. Often, we tell students to “just do” something, but that student may not be clear on what we actually expect. It opened my eyes to how I assumed most kids just knew what I expected when I was less-than-clear (at least from their perspective).

The course ran a little over $800 in 2010, but I am not sure of the current price (order it here), but I really enjoyed it and benefited from it. This is not a “paid” recommendation in any way. I genuinely benefited from this course and wanted to provide a good review, because information about Model-Netics is sparse online. I am often a critic of continuing education in the field of education. I think a lot of it is too theoretical and glosses over real skills that help teachers and students.

I can safely say that what I learned in Model-Netics was more practically applicable than 80% of what I learned in college and graduate school. Overall, Model-Netics is a great course that has helped me both as a teacher and small business owner.

About David Bennett

David Bennett is a teacher, author, and speaker. His articles receive over a million hits per year and have appeared in a variety of publications. He is co-owner of a communication company, and he also writes for The Popular Teen and other sites. Follow him on LinkedIn or Twitter.